Breaking News: U.S. Holocaust Museum Revokes Human Rights Award Given To Aung San Suu Kyi

“We had hoped that you — as someone we and many others have celebrated for your commitment to human dignity and universal human rights — would have done something to condemn and stop the military’s brutal campaign and to express solidarity with the targeted Rohingya population,” the museum wrote in a March 6 letter to the Myanmar leader.

Suu Kyi’s political party “has instead refused to cooperate with United Nations investigators, promulgated hateful rhetoric against the Rohingya community, and denied access to and cracked down on journalists trying to uncover the scope of the crimes in Rakhine State,” the letter continued.

Although Myanmar is home to over a million Rohingyas, the Buddhist-majority country doesn’t recognize their rights. Myanmar classifies them as illegal immigrants, not citizens.

In recent years, the violence against the Rohingya carried out by state officials and Buddhist extremists has included rape, arson, shootings, beatings, and torture. These acts amount to ethnic cleansing and crimes against humanity, according to international rights organizations. Some human rights groups argue the violence looks increasingly like genocide.

Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize winner, has denied the damning evidence and dismissed reports as “misinformation.”

Her government has also blocked U.N. investigators from entering Rakhine to assess the abuses and permits few aid organizations to operate there. Two Reuters journalists were detained after reporting on a mass grave of Rohingya men and charged under the country’s Official Secrets Act. They face 14 years in prison.